Political expediency or doing what's right?

The oft repeated phrase: "politics is the art of the possible" explains why durable, just policy is seldom formulated. Abstraction of specific issues or proposals leads to political horse trading over policies or solutions which rarely achieve their desired effect and often create (un)intended consequences which are worse than the previous status quo.

Until we work on developing solutions, irrespective of political expediency, in the full context of the political economy, the spiral into complexity and eventual collapse will continue. One example, of the arguments for political expediency crowding out the sanity of an integrated, elegant solution, is a recent meeting at the House of Commons organised by GlobalNet21 on Basic Income. The panel emphasised the politics of gaining support for "basic income" which gave rise to framing the debate into the narrow confines of affordability within the existing tax and benefits framework. Furthermore, the budgetary constraints which inevitably arise from such an approach meant that the debate was around "basic income" (£70 pw) rather than the means to a decent, comfortable life.

Sharing the value of the commons (land, resources, knowledge, nature etc.), which rightfully belong to no-one but should be available to everyone, is the other side of the coin to provide every human being with the means to life. Before enclosures and the industrial revolution, everyone could use nature to survive. Clearly returning to such a situation is impossible today but applying the principle through taxation (eg.Land Value Tax) to fund a proper citizens dividend is relatively straightforward and done right would also fund public services allowing income, employment, sales and other taxes to be reduced, or even abolished in time.

The arguments for an unconditional citizens dividend (UCD) have been well rehearsed in Daily Pickings and elsewhere, including this week's basic income meeting at the House of Commons.

In search of benefits

Something for nothing?

The case for taxing land is overwhelming: The rich, tax and land

In logistical terms, the solutions to our problems aren't complex and when one looks at the whole picture, one sees clearly how the existing political economy operates for the benefit of the Structural Elite and their elevated cattle.

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We can solve our problems through a small number of radical changes; it is not rocket science but the current political economy is the impediment. If every campaign and person focus on these fundamental issues, solutions to their own particular concerns will emerge.

New Model Charter

Doing what is right takes precedence over political expediency and makes the "impossible" possible.

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Comments   

 
0 #2 Clive Menzies 2016-06-24 16:40
Agreed on all counts. I'm sure there are lessons but our power is greater through communications and information technology. We just know so much more about how all the issues are connected. The path laid by others before is there to follow:
http://www.freecriticalthinking.org/images/Documents/LeaptoSalvation/NewModelCharter.pdf
 
 
0 #1 Janos Abel 2016-06-24 14:28
Applying critical thinking to critical thought

Quote:
We can solve our problems through a small number of radical changes; it is not rocket science but the current political economy is the impediment. If every campaign and person focus on these fundamental issues, solutions to their own particular concerns will emerge.
What seems radical in one historical frame may not be so in another.

Two examples:
  • Universal (male) franchise
  • Winning the vote for women

Any lessons with the benefit of hindsight?
 

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